Daryl Conner

March 12, 2013

The Practitioner’s Journey: Return

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We’re continuing to unfold the story of Sara, a fictitious change practitioner who is on a journey to find out who she is and learn to redefine how she shows up with clients. After recouping from the draining victory over the “dragon,” Sara reengaged with the practitioners she had left behind at the beginning of her odyssey. She was excited about sharing her wonderful news and couldn’t wait to see them develop the strength and freedom she now enjoyed as a practitioner. But it didn’t go as she expected…

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August 21, 2012

The Four Kinds of Burning Platforms

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Contrary to how some people relate to the term “burning platform,” I don’t see it as a story of disaster. To me it’s a tale of courage and tenacity that illustrates the commitment necessary to face the risk and uncertainty inherent in departing from the current state of affairs.
I never intended to give the impression that an emergency was always necessary to motivate sustained major change. If one word is associated with the story, I would prefer it be resolve rather than peril. People don’t have to face a life-threatening situation or organizational insolvency in order to support fundamental change. I’ll say more about that in this post.

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May 24, 2012

“Let’s Cut to the Chase”

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In this series, I will talk about how to respond to a client who wants you to give him or her a straightforward, broad perspective of what an organization will have to do to fully realize the goals of a large change initiative. I will share my responses to two hypothetical questions: “What is a realistic set of expectations I should have about embarking on this change?” and “Can you give me some general DOs and DON’Ts that will likely apply to what we’re facing?”

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September 28, 2011

Danger? Opportunity? You Decide.

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This series is about the importance of being able to reframe a person’s mindset during a change initiative to shift how he or she sees and interprets certain things. In this post, I talk about “danger” people and “opportunity” people, and describe how each responds to reframing.

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September 6, 2011

Changing Someone’s Mind—The Basics of Reframing

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Why is reframing important? Professional change agents must be able to influence those they serve—especially sponsors. Sometimes they must reshape others’ views, as well as their understanding of a situation, to help achieve the goals of a change initiative.

In this new series, I address the key reframing skills every practitioner should know, and include such topics as:

How to be direct and explicit when reframing others
Why frame of reference and priorities are so important when reframing a person’s mindset
The difference between reframing “danger” people and “opportunity” people

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July 26, 2011

Guest Interview—Dean Anderson

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I recently interviewed Dean Anderson, a thought-leader in the field of organization transformation. Dean’s unique understanding of mindset, culture, and process gives him a deep strategic perspective, but he also has a depth and strength of character that very few people in the industry offer. During our conversation, Dean talked about the correlation between success and leaders’ mindsets, whether change should be managed from the top down or bottom up, and the number one way to make resistance to change go away.

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July 13, 2011

How to Make Shift Happen

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In this series, we’ve been exploring the evolution of organizational paradigms. In my last post, I talked about the collapse/renewal phase, the place where either shift “happens” or it “hits the fan.” Here, I’ll pick up with an exploration of what is involved when orchestrating a new paradigm. It requires a four-part approach involving leadership, a learning environment, a new culture, and resilience.

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