Daryl Conner

October 15, 2013

What Can You Gain By Incorporating Character and Presence Into Your Work?

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Now that executing organizational change is an accepted professional discipline, there is an abundance of both internal and external practitioners; and more join the ranks all the time.
In observing this steady expansion over the years, I’ve noticed an interesting pattern. It appears that the majority of people in our field for five years or more fall into one of three categories. In this brief post, I will call attention to why one category is most likely to engage in a meaningful pursuit of character and presence and why I feel it is important.

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August 27, 2013

The Five Archetypes of Thought Leadership

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So far in this series on thought leadership, I have stressed the need for an increased focus on character and presence. I introduced five archetypes—Eager Apprentices, Solid Performers, Adept Adventurers, Periodic Contributors, and Thought Leaders—as part of a benefit continuum that reflects the value change agents provide those they serve. In this post, I will explain how each archetype exemplifies a different way in which character and presence play a role in the practice of our craft.

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August 13, 2013

What Does It Take to Be a Thought Leader in the Field of Change Facilitation?

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There is plenty of cutting-edge thinking about our frameworks, tools, and methodologies, but little thought leadership related to the who we are side of our craft.
It is time to step into a new era where we pursue more frequent and deeper investigations of how we show up when engaged in our work. We must also take more responsibility for creating thought leadership to support this aspect of our individual and collective development. I hope that this new series will serve as a call to action for us as a professional community.

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August 6, 2013

Reflections on Character and Presence (free download)

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A few months ago, I shifted the main focus of my writing on this blog from “what we do” to how we come forward as human beings when practicing our craft—who we are.

I marked this change in emphasis with the release of two core series—Character and Presence and Cultivating Your Character—that I consider the center of gravity for the who we are perspective. I then asked several practitioners whom I respect to write guest posts about how they relate to these two series.

I have compiled the two series, the reflections of two master change practitioners, and my answers to questions on character and presence into a document that I am now making available as a free download.

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July 16, 2013

Revisiting “Empowerment”

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I’m continuing my look back to previous series, through the lens of character and presence. This week, we’re looking at empowerment. I discuss the difference between empowerment and delegation, how to earn empowerment, the characteristics of an empowered person, as well as building blocks—and roadblocks—to empowerment. As you read, I invite you to consider five questions related to character and presence.

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July 2, 2013

It’s Not About What You Do

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I was recently interviewed by Heather Stagl on her radio show, Enclaria, where we tackled several questions related to character and presence.
Branding and distinctiveness in your work as a master change practitioner is not about tools and techniques. It’s about who you are. The way to come forward with who you are is to understand and use character and presence as a key part of the value that you bring to the work you do.

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June 4, 2013

Answering Your Questions About Character and Presence

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I recently published two series outlining why I think character and presence are so important to change facilitators seeking mastery in our profession. Many people strongly resonated with this topic—the responses have been quite remarkable. In this light, several themes emerged in the questions practitioners have been asking me about all this, and I thought I would share a few of them, along with my answers.

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