Daryl Conner

September 19, 2012

Victimization: A Thorn in the Side of Change Execution

Post 1 of 4 in the Victimization series

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Many challenges and roadblocks hinder the successful execution of major change, but few rival the obstructive power unleashed when people act as—or allow themselves to be treated as—victims. Victimization is a disease that destroys the confidence a person needs to sustain a transformative journey, and it has reached epidemic proportions among not only targets, but sponsors and agents as well. In this series, I will discuss the basics of the disease, how it breeds in work environments, how change exacerbates the syndrome, and how we can limit victim tendencies in ourselves and others.

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September 25, 2012

Victimization Breeds Easily in Work Environments

Post 2 of 4 in the Victimization series

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In this series, we’re talking about the prevalence and consequences of victimization during change. I defined a victim as one who feels trapped in negative circumstances with no option but to endure. I contrasted this mindset with that of the influencer (a person who believes he or she has choices to make that have an effect on the outcome of negative circumstances). In this post, I focus on the implications when victimization plays itself out in organizational settings.

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October 2, 2012

Change Throws Gasoline on the Flames of Victimization

Post 3 of 4 in the Victimization series

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In the two previous posts of this series on victimization, I wrote about the negative impact it can have on people and organizations. Here, I describe what happens when victimization surfaces during a change initiative, and the ways it effects our profession.

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October 9, 2012

Stemming the Tide of Victimization

Post 4 of 4 in the Victimization series

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This is the final post in my series on victimization. The victimization syndrome can be compared to a virus that has infected not only clients, but our profession as well. Transformational change intensifies existing victimization and brings any latent tendencies to the surface. No one—advocates, agents, targets, or sponsors—is immune from its destructive power. In this post, I review some perspectives I’ve found helpful with clients, other practitioners, and myself as we all contend with our own vulnerability to victimization.

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