Daryl Conner

November 29, 2010

Embedding Structured Flexibility Into the Implementation Process

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When implementing organizational change, the zone where regulation and unruliness intersect offers the greatest possibility for people and organizations to adapt. In this post, I describe the process of “structured flexibility,” which is a framework for exploiting this area. The post contains a downloadable flowchart of this process.

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November 24, 2010

Order and Chaos

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In my opinion, methodologies are never an impeccable fit for every situation they are applied to. People need breathing room to tailor the concepts, techniques, and processes to address the unique variables in their situations. How can we provide the structure and discipline necessary to capitalize on a solid change methodology, while also giving people the room to localize it to their particular situation?

In this two-part series, I describe a process, called “structured flexibility,” that allows people and organizations to adapt to shifting circumstances.

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November 17, 2010

Putting It All Together—The Mechanics of Capacity Management

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In this final posting of the capacity and demand series, we’ll look at the mechanics of the actual capacity management process and explore how it can be used to balance the demands of change with the capacity that remains.

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November 9, 2010

How to Manage Capacity

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You might assume that future shock (which happens when the demands of change exceed a person’s or group’s capacity to properly deal with the implications) is something to avoid at all cost. However, that’s not what I’ve seen from leaders who consistently achieve their change objectives.

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November 2, 2010

How Do People Learn to Adapt to Change?

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To realize the intended benefits of a major change, the people affected must have the capacity to adapt, which means they must have sufficient mental, emotional, and physical energy to incorporate new mindsets and behaviors. If change demand exceeds available adaptation capacity, overload occurs, which causes dysfunctional mindsets and behaviors–in other words, future shock.

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