Daryl Conner

August 31, 2010

Manage Intent to Deliver on Promises and Minimize Disappointment

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As a professional change community, we have not always paid sufficient attention to intent. Our focus has often been more on getting people to adapt to a change than on the change itself. What I mean is, sometimes we are so attentive to issues like resistance and commitment that we fail to see that the people involved lack a common understanding of what is being asked of them. I can say this was certainly true for me until a missing part to the change puzzle was revealed.

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August 25, 2010

Guest Interview—Rick Maurer

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I’ve just posted an audio of a recent conversation I had with Rick Maurer. Rick is the author of several books, including Beyond the Wall of Resistance, and I have been following his work for some time. In the interview, I ask Rick for his opinion about the high (70%) failure rate of change initiatives, and he talks about the three areas he thinks contribute to the dismal statistic. Rick also discusses resistance to change, which he classifies into three types, “I don’t get it,” I don’t like it,” and “I don’t like you.”
I really enjoyed the conversation, and I hope you’ll listen in.

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August 17, 2010

One Practitioner’s Art Is Another’s Science

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The change execution profession constantly adjusts the relationship between what it knows and what it is still learning. The same can be said for us as individual practitioners. In fact, it is the individual level of this balancing act that ultimately drives new findings into the collective science and art of our entire profession.

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August 10, 2010

Weaving Science With Art—Over and Over Again

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In my years of facilitating change and coaching change agents, I’ve seen people use many different routes to become skilled practitioners. Some approaches are much more effective than others but all address, in one way or the other, how science and art influence an agent’s maturation.
In this post, I’ll talk about a sequence for practitioner development that has worked for numerous people I have helped move forward on their journey toward mastery.

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August 3, 2010

The Constantly Shifting Emphasis Between Science and Art

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The longer we practice our craft, the more “science” we accumulate in our repertoire. This is a good thing; however, every safe haven has its price. The more extensive our experience, the more accustomed we become to what unfolds in a variety of situations and the more standard our interpretations and interventions become. When practitioners experience a wide range of circumstances that are both familiar and manageable, they are said to possess the highly sought-after currency of credibility—expertise. We all want this kind of deep proficiency, and yet it can be our downfall if it isn’t balanced by maintaining a sense of awe and wonder.

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