Daryl Conner

July 27, 2010

Finding the Balance Between Logic and Creativity

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BREAKING NEWS: Daryl will speak on bridging the gap between project management and change management on Peter de Jager’s webinar program this Thursday, July 29 at noon. To learn more and register please visit https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/676031683.

Change agents who practice their craft with the proper balance of art and science foster success patterns and minimize failure patterns. In doing so, they bring to bear a powerful competitive advantage for their clients.

However, finding that balance is a challenge.

Professional change facilitation resides on a continuum, with “art” and “science” at the poles. Our “craft” is represented by a sliding point that can reside at any position between the two extremes. Movement toward or away from either end of the continuum shouldn’t be based on our comfort with or prejudice for one or the other. Instead, we should practice our craft as circumstances dictate…sometimes skewed toward the science of our work, sometimes reflecting more of the artful aspects.

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July 22, 2010

Our Craft Is a Blend of Art and Science

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“Art and science have their meeting point in method.” ~Earl Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

Fundamental organizational shifts are partly chaotic and partly predictable. We have to be able to plan for and address the known aspects of change and at the same time acknowledge and deal with the inevitable puzzles, contradictions, and conundrums that arise.

Think of the execution of organizational change as a continuum. At one extreme, it is a stable process where we manage events by applying set rules and formulas. Here, a “paint by numbers” or cookbook solution would be acceptable. At the other end, it is a

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July 13, 2010

Guest Interview—Peter de Jager

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Today’s post is an audio of a conversation I had with Peter de Jager. Peter and I have both been in the change business for a very long time. We’ve crossed paths on occasion, but only recently opened a dialogue, and I have really enjoyed it. Peter is a prolific speaker (he has presented keynote addresses on change management in 37 countries) and has written hundreds of articles for publications as diverse as the Washington Post and Scientific America.

In the first segment, Peter describes what he means by “a rational assimilation of the future.” He also expounds on his opinion that resistance to change is a myth, his provocative way of presenting information, and why he hates

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July 7, 2010

How to Get Unstuck

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In my last post, I wrote about what happens when initiatives become “stuck.” Challenges and obstacles to implementation are a regular and expected occurrence in any change initiative. They become problematic, however, when the attending change agent doesn’t have a plan he or she believes in, or even an idea, of how to solve the problem.

There is a framework practitioners can use to determine how to get unstuck, regardless of the nature of the desired outcome, or the implementation approach used (Kotter, Bridges, Anderson, Prosci, Conner, etc.), or the specific actions they call into play. This post provides a way to look at a generic intervention process and how to apply it to any change or execution methodology.

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