Daryl Conner

June 30, 2010

Are You Stuck?

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We all get stuck sometimes…it’s part of the human experience. We know what we want to achieve and have a plan for doing it, but suddenly we’re faced with a challenge that mystifies us. The situation may involve a problem or opportunity, but the fact is, we don’t know how to resolve it given the present circumstances (or aren’t willing to because of certain implications). In other words, becoming unstuck isn’t about problems/opportunities—it’s about problems/opportunities with no clear way to address them.

There are as many ways to be stuck as there are aspects to our lives. We can become stuck with our spouse or kids, our friends, our careers or boss, our physical well-being, our spiritual development, etc. Anything of significance that we set out to accomplish can, and most likely will, become stuck at one time or another.

Professional change facilitators are not immune to being stuck. From time to time, even the most accomplished practitioners, applying the most capable execution methodologies, are unable to find a viable resolution to a particular

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June 24, 2010

Patterns Aren’t Created, They Are Revealed

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We don’t own patterns, yet we are all responsible for them.

Some of us might be fortunate enough to be the first to observe and document a pattern, but we didn’t invent it, we uncovered it. Adjusting to the unfamiliar has been part of the human experience since the beginning of time. Any change-related pattern we use was in play long before any of us started practicing this craft. And even though some of us have fashioned our own particular way of articulating transition dynamics (nomenclature, principles, guidelines, axioms) the basic patterns can’t be commandeered by any of us.

So, we can’t take credit for conceiving the patterns of change, but because we did discover them, we have a responsibility

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June 16, 2010

Five Lenses for Viewing Patterns of Change (cont’d)

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In my last post, I shared three of the lenses I use to observe the patterns (mindset and behaviors) that I pay attention to:

* The importance placed on matching change challenges with the appropriate commitment
* The importance placed on the intent of the change
* The importance placed on sponsors

Now, I’ll continue with the last two lenses:

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June 10, 2010

Five Lenses for Viewing Patterns of Change

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We’ve been talking about lenses that practitioners can use to identify patterns, and to help sponsors deal with change. I’m sure there are lenses you pay most attention to, and I encourage you to share them here. I’ll tell you about five I often rely on:

* The importance placed on matching challenge and commitment to change
* The importance placed on the intent of the change
* The importance placed on sponsors
* The importance leaders place on agents
* Leaders’ understanding of the nature of organizational change success

Each of these lenses reveals a series of mindset and behavior patterns.

Here are a few representative examples of the success mindset patterns

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June 1, 2010

Use Mindset and Behavior Patterns to Your Advantage

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Once you understand that a specific mindset and its associated behaviors can either facilitate or impede success, you have a level of insight that can be truly invaluable to a sponsor who is less familiar with these kinds of change dynamics.

Mindsets are made up of frames of reference (the ways individuals make sense of situations) that lead to the formation of priorities (the relative importance of various options). Shared mindsets within an organization serve as the foundations of culture and ultimately lead to common patterns of behavior.

Successful change requires a specific mindset that is shared among key players as they perform their respective roles. This “success mindset” reflects the

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